About Richmond RCMP

The RCMP has been serving the community of Richmond since 1950. We are the 3rd largest detachment in Canada, with 229 Regular and Civilian members, and 200 volunteers, serving Richmond’s 207,500 residents.


We strive to provide an open, effective and service-oriented police service. Part of that outreach is through Twitter, which we use almost daily to communicate with thousands. And some of our outreach is old fashioned, such as our foot patrols through the city centre, which we established in 2012. Feedback has been great!


Our priorities, determined in consultation with the community, are:

We invite residents to check out our Crime Prevention guide, done in partnership with the City of Richmond. The guide is at http://www.richmond.ca/crimeprevention, and at Community Safety and police stations.

Our outreach to the Richmond business community has also grown substantially, through our Business Link program, (www.richmond.ca/businesslink) with timely crime reporting and prevention information, a monthly newsletter, email alerts and crime mapping. Outreach is also done in several languages, to inform businesses how to report crime.

Richmond RCMP’s priorities for 2015-2017

  1. Reduce property crime

    Richmond’s property crime rate is falling, but we know more work is still required – for example in residential break and enters and thefts from automobiles.

    Read about how Biography

    Supt. Rennie Nesset
    Officer in Charge

     

    The RCMP has been serving the community of Richmond since 1950. We are the 3rd largest detachment in Canada, with 229 Regular and Civilian members, and 200 volunteers, serving Richmond’s 207,500 residents.


    We strive to provide an open, effective and service-oriented police service. Part of that outreach is through Twitter, which we use almost daily to communicate with thousands. And some of our outreach is old fashioned, such as our foot patrols through the city centre, which we established in 2012. Feedback has been great!


    Our priorities, determined in consultation with the community, are:

    • Reduce incidence of property crime
    • Reduce traffic related injuries and death
    • Enhance engagement and partnering with citizens and community stakeholders
    • Reduce youth victimization and entry into the criminal justice system
    • Disrupt organized crime.

    We invite residents to check out our Crime Prevention guide, done in partnership with the City of Richmond. The guide is at http://www.richmond.ca/crimeprevention, and at Community Safety and police stations.

    Our outreach to the Richmond business community has also grown substantially, through our Business Link program, (www.richmond.ca/businesslink) with timely crime reporting and prevention information, a monthly newsletter, email alerts and crime mapping. Outreach is also done in several languages, to inform businesses how to report crime.

    Richmond RCMP’s priorities for 2015-2017

    1. Reduce property crime

      Richmond’s property crime rate is falling, but we know more work is still required – for example in residential break and enters and thefts from automobiles.

      Read about how

      Supt. Rennie Nesset
      Officer in Charge
      Biography

       

      The RCMP has been serving the community of Richmond since 1950. We are the 3rd largest detachment in Canada, with 229 Regular and Civilian members, and 200 volunteers, serving Richmond’s 207,500 residents.


      We strive to provide an open, effective and service-oriented police service. Part of that outreach is through Twitter, which we use almost daily to communicate with thousands. And some of our outreach is old fashioned, such as our foot patrols through the city centre, which we established in 2012. Feedback has been great!


      Our priorities, determined in consultation with the community, are:

      • Reduce incidence of property crime
      • Reduce traffic related injuries and death
      • Enhance engagement and partnering with citizens and community stakeholders
      • Reduce youth victimization and entry into the criminal justice system
      • Disrupt organized crime.

      We invite residents to check out our Crime Prevention guide, done in partnership with the City of Richmond. The guide is at http://www.richmond.ca/crimeprevention, and at Community Safety and police stations.

      Our outreach to the Richmond business community has also grown substantially, through our Business Link program, (www.richmond.ca/businesslink) with timely crime reporting and prevention information, a monthly newsletter, email alerts and crime mapping. Outreach is also done in several languages, to inform businesses how to report crime.

      Richmond RCMP’s priorities for 2015-2017

      1. Reduce property crime

        Richmond’s property crime rate is falling, but we know more work is still required – for example in residential break and enters and thefts from automobiles.

        Read about how Richmond’s Quick Response Team arrested a prolific purse snatcher in June 2015. The suspect had been preying on victims on shopping malls.

      2. Improve road safety

        Road safety is a significant concern for our community, and automobile collisions impose a terrible financial and human toll. Despite notable reductions in fatal and injurious collisions in previous years, Richmond has experienced a recent increase in such collisions.

        In March 2015 a driver was charged in the November 2013 death of a 76-year-old man. Additionally, see how Richmond RCMP teamed up with ICBC to teach students about the dangers of drinking and driving.

      3. Community Engagement

        Our stakeholders tell us they’re pleased with our community engagement efforts, but they want even more. To us that means more face-to-face interactions, visible policing, or nourishing our partnerships. Ultimately, community engagement is a very important part of our efforts to reduce crime.

        Our detachment regularly holds workshops or hosts meetings for the public, such as the counterfeit currency workshop in January 2015.

      4. Reduce youth victimization

        Richmond RCMP have two-part strategy to enhance the safety of local youth – reaching out and engaging youth through a variety of methods such as mentoring, and also intervening when appropriate, such as through restorative justice programs.

        We paired up with the City and Richmond Fire to host three one-day camps for youths during summer 2015, dubbed Camp Courage. Additionally in May 2015 our detachment helped a 10-year-old boy with Down Syndrome, fulfill his wish of being a police officer.

      5. Disrupt organized crime

        Organized crime remains a significant threat to Richmond’s social and economic well-being. Drug production and trafficking continue to be the primary sources of revenue for gangs. Other activities may include extortion, loan sharking, money laundering, prostitution and credit card fraud.

        In June 2015 Richmond RCMP’s Organized Crime Unit shut down a cocaine drug line, selling hard drugs throughout Richmond. Charges were approved against 8 individuals.

      Learn more about your Richmond RCMP >

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